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Navigating a Pregnancy with Diabetes

Millions of American women live with Type 1 or Type 2 diabetes, and each year, many of them become pregnant. You may already be well-versed in how to manage your diabetes when you’re not pregnant, but pregnancy may require some changes to how you care for your health.

You probably already know that having diabetes makes your pregnancy higher risk. But with regular checkups and good control of your blood sugar, you can have a normal pregnancy and a healthy baby. 

Our expert OB/GYN, Dr. Alan Patterson, explains more about how we can work together to manage your diabetes while you’re pregnant

Preconception is the best time for a first visit

When you’re trying to conceive, it’s a good idea to schedule a preconception appointment with Dr. Patterson so he can evaluate how well you’re managing your diabetes. 

Some of the preconception tests we may run include:

Using the results of these tests, we can get a better picture of your overall health and see if there are any lifestyle changes you need to make before trying to get pregnant, such as tweaking your diet or your medication.

Good blood sugar control is the goal

Every patient must do a one-hour glucose screening test anywhere from 20-28 weeks. This screening is conducted at Dr. Patterson's office. If the screening test is abnormal, then you must return for a fasting blood sugar and a three-hour glucose challenge test. If that test proves to be abnormal, then you have gestational diabetes. In this case, Dr. Patterson and the perinatologist will work together to manage your condition and appropriate treatment. 

Risks of uncontrolled diabetes in pregnancy

One reason that we recommend preconception checkups when possible is because the risk of birth defects due to uncontrolled blood glucose levels, is high between 8-12 weeks of pregnancy, when many women don’t know they’re pregnant yet. 

Other risks from uncontrolled high glucose levels include miscarriage and stillbirth, worsening of diabetes-related eye and kidney problems, and an increased risk of having a large baby (called macrosomia.) Another risk of high blood sugar levels is developing a dangerous condition called pre-eclampsia, during which you have high blood pressure and protein in your urine.

Managing pregnancy with diabetes

Following a healthy, well-balanced diet is always important, but it’s even more so when you’re pregnant and have diabetes. The perinatologist that Dr. Patterson has referred you to, will put you on a diabetic diet to treat your gestational diabetes.

Remaining physically active during pregnancy is also especially important when you have diabetes. Not only will exercise help your body to prepare for childbirth, it also helps keep your blood sugar under control.

With your conscientious efforts and our help, we can work together to manage your diabetes throughout your pregnancy so you have a healthy baby. If you have more questions about how diabetes can impact your pregnancy, call our office in Coral Springs, Florida, or request an appointment online.

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Millions of American women live with Type 1 or Type 2 diabetes, and each year, many of them become pregnant. You may already be well-versed in how to manage your diabetes when you’re not pregnant, but pregnancy may require some changes to how you care for your health.

 

You probably already know that having diabetes makes your pregnancy higher risk. But with regular checkups and good control of your blood sugar, you can have a normal pregnancy and a healthy baby. 

 

Our expert OB/GYN, Dr. Alan Patterson, explains more about how we can work together to manage your diabetes while you’re pregnant

Preconception is the best time for a first visit

When you’re trying to conceive, it’s a good idea to schedule a preconception appointment with Dr. Patterson so he can evaluate how well you’re managing your diabetes. 

 

Some of the preconception tests we may run include:

 

 

Using the results of these tests, we can get a better picture of your overall health and see if there are any lifestyle changes you need to make before trying to get pregnant, such as tweaking your diet or your medication.

Good blood sugar control is the goal

Every patient must do a one hour glucose screening test anywhere from 20-28 weeks. This screening is conducted at Dr Patterson's office. If the screening test is abnormal, then you must return for a fasting blood sugar and a three hour glucose challenge test. If that test proves to be abnormal, then you have gestational diabetes. In this case, Dr. Patterson and the perinatologist will work together to manage your condition and appropriate treatment. 

Risks of uncontrolled diabetes in pregnancy

One reason that we recommend preconception checkups when possible is because the risk of birth defects due to uncontrolled blood glucose levels is high between 8-12 weeks of pregnancy, when many women don’t know they’re pregnant yet. 

 

Other risks from uncontrolled high glucose levels include miscarriage and stillbirth, worsening of diabetes-related eye and kidney problems, and an increased risk of having a large baby (called macrosomia.) Another risk of high blood sugar levels is developing a dangerous condition called pre-eclampsia, during which you have high blood pressure and protein in your urine.

Managing pregnancy with diabetes

Following a healthy, well-balanced diet is always important, but it’s even more so when you’re pregnant and have diabetes. The perinatologist that Dr. Patterson has referred you to, will put you on a diabetic diet to treat your gestational diabetes.



Remaining physically active during pregnancy is also especially important when you have diabetes. Not only will exercise help your body to prepare for childbirth, it also helps keep your blood sugar under control.

 

With your conscientious efforts and our help, we can work together to manage your diabetes throughout your pregnancy so you have a healthy baby. If you have more questions about how diabetes can impact your pregnancy, call our office in Coral Springs, Florida, or request an appointment online.

 

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COVID-19 Update:

  1. We are still seeing obstetrics patients in our office to ensure that our pregnant patients are getting the care they need. If you’re pregnant, please call us to book your appointment today. We’re also seeing patients who are having gynecological problems or emergencies.

 

  1. Here's what we're doing to ensure the safety of our patients who come into the office for their appointments:

Patients may not be accompanied by other people at their appointments.

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